Author Topic: get set  (Read 1432 times)

Offline arturas

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get set
« on: February 17, 2017, 03:50:47 pm »
Hi there,

I can't get the idea of what get set means in the following sentence:

As people get older, they get set in their ways.

I know that it has something to do with a habit, but could you please rephrase this sentence for me ?

Regards,
Arturas

Offline admin

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Re: get set
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2017, 05:18:21 pm »
Get set has two meanings.

1. Be prepared to do something. As in a race. Get set; ready; so. In that sense, it does mean to be in position.
2. Set - as in glue. I have glued those two pieces together. Do you think they are set now? So, get set in their ways means that they have a habitual routine - they always do the same thing.

So their is similarity - but there are differences.
Best wishes,

Duncan Baker
http://www.lydbury.co.uk

Offline Britta

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Re: get set
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2017, 11:53:53 am »
A bit of colour might help:

As people get older, they get set in their ways.

"Set in their ways" means people like to do things in a certain way (bathing on a special day, cleaning house in a special order of tasks, eating habits etc.)

When people grow older they become less flexible.
If it's not used by a native speaker it's not idiomatic. And idiom trumps grammar every time. Jack Wilkerson†

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Re: get set
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2017, 03:30:15 pm »
Yes. That is what  meant in my point #2- but you have clarified it - thanks Britta
Best wishes,

Duncan Baker
http://www.lydbury.co.uk