Author Topic: ---- I couldn't BEAR to see the Niagara anywhere else!  (Read 86 times)

Offline t k

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 755
---- I couldn't BEAR to see the Niagara anywhere else!
« on: November 14, 2017, 03:10:40 am »
Jack Stepney, in his new character as the richest nephew, tacitly took the lead, emphasizing his importance by the deeper gloss of his mourning and the subdued authority of his manner; while his wife's bored attitude and frivolous gown proclaimed the heiress's disregard of the insignificant interests at stake. Old Ned Van Alstyne, seated next to her in a coat that made affliction dapper, twirled his white moustache to conceal the eager twitch of his lips; and Grace Stepney, red-nosed and smelling of crape, whispered emotionally to Mrs. Herbert Melson: "I couldn't BEAR to see the Niagara anywhere else!"  (from The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton; a larger context is here; use ctrl-f to locate the sentence)

Please explain "I couldn't BEAR to see the Niagara anywhere else!"  Thanks.  --- tk

Offline admin

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2426
  • Director at Lydbury English Centre Ltd
    • Lydbury English Centre Ltd
Re: ---- I couldn't BEAR to see the Niagara anywhere else!
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2017, 11:11:08 am »
Your click takes us to the whole chapter list - so I am not sure where to go.

From the limited context, I assume he just would not wish to see anything different - he is not looking for anything to change.
Best wishes,

Duncan Baker
http://www.lydbury.co.uk

Offline t k

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 755
Re: ---- I couldn't BEAR to see the Niagara anywhere else!
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2017, 03:04:22 am »
Your click takes us to the whole chapter list - so I am not sure where to go.

Thanks, Duncan.  It's a one-page link: it includes the list of the chapter links as well as the entire text contents.  --- tk

Offline Mr Tasker

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 39
Re: ---- I couldn't BEAR to see the Niagara anywhere else!
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2017, 06:23:29 am »
It would appear that "the Niagara" is a painting, judging by a later reference in chapter 9:

"... admired the purple satin drawing-room curtains, the Dying Gladiator in the window, and the seven-by-five painting of Niagara which represented the one artistic excess of Mr. Peniston's temperate career."

How the reader is supposed to guess this without having read the later reference, I'm not sure. Perhaps it was a common subject for paintings that a contemporary reader would have understood to be a kitsch cultural artifact. Perhaps a bit like The Green Lady.