Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Language Questions / Re: can have a soda
« Last post by admin on Today at 10:59:47 am »
No.
Your sentence means it is possible for you to have a soda when eating out>

I could have... means almost the same as I might have.
2
Language Questions / can have a soda
« Last post by navi on Today at 09:07:02 am »
1) I can have a soda with my meal if I'm eating out.

Could this mean:

I might have a soda with my meal if I'm eating out.

Gratefully,
Navi
3
Language Questions / Re: blood test
« Last post by Darryl on Today at 12:04:38 am »
1) I have to do a blood test.   No
2) I have to take a blood test. No
3) I have to get a blood test. OK
4) I have to have a blood test. The best choice
5) I have to have a blood test done. Yes, but done is superfluous.
6) I have to undergo a blood test. Yes, but it implies that the test is stressful.

Which can be used if my blood is going to be tested and I am not the one who is doing the testing?

Gratefully,
Navi
4
Language Questions / blood test
« Last post by navi on April 19, 2018, 08:00:19 pm »
1) I have to do a blood test.
2) I have to take a blood test.
3) I have to get a blood test.
4) I have to have a blood test.
5) I have to have a blood test done.
6) I have to undergo a blood test.

Which can be used if my blood is going to be tested and I am not the one who is doing the testing?

Gratefully,
Navi
5
Language Questions / Re: ---- two mature women, a clean-shaved individual
« Last post by Bertha on April 18, 2018, 12:05:07 pm »
They are the people she (the lady of the house) is "rearranging her mental impressions" of.  See the previous sentence in the paragraph in the original.
6
Language Questions / Re: ---- two mature women, a clean-shaved individual
« Last post by admin on April 17, 2018, 02:20:22 pm »
Two ladies past the first flush of youth
A man who had shaved very recently

I am not sure how they relate - the punctuation is very strange - it seems to be just a list of people.
7
Women can provide those qualities - they can be tender and ingenious and can fiercely defend their menfolk.
8
And it was as of a woman that he thought of her—the specially choice incarnation of the feminine, wherein is recruited the tender, ingenuous, and fierce bodyguard for all sorts of men who talk under the influence of an emotion, true or fraudulent; for preachers, seers, prophets, or reformers.  (from The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad; a larger context is here; use ctrl-f to locate the sentence)

Please explain "wherein is recruited ... for all sorts of men".  Thanks.  --- tk
9
Language Questions / ---- two mature women, a clean-shaved individual
« Last post by t k on April 17, 2018, 04:14:15 am »
Men with grey moustaches and full, healthy, vaguely smiling countenances approached, circling round the screen; two mature women with a matronly air of gracious resolution; a clean-shaved individual with sunken cheeks, and dangling a gold-mounted eyeglass on a broad black ribbon with an old-world, dandified effect.  (from The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad; a larger context is here; use ctrl-f to locate the sentence)

Please explain "two mature women" and "a clean-shaved individual".  How do they relate with the first part of the sentence?  Thanks.  --- tk
10
Language Questions / Re: Gerund
« Last post by Bertha on April 15, 2018, 12:13:09 pm »
Gerunds and present participles can confuse users since both end with -ing

In your sentences, the first one could be either one.  If it's without the apostrophe, the -ing form is a present participle, which acts as modifier to the preceding noun (Jamie), similar to an adjective. So, "I heard Jamie" who is singing.  If an apostrophe appears, the -ing form is a gerund, which is a noun form, and it becomes the object instead of Jamie:  "I heard singing" As it happens the singing belongs to Jamie.  It is true that the latter seems more formal.

In the second sentence, it's the same really.  The choice of usage depends on the idea you want to provide and maybe it could be slightly more emphasis on the who or on the what.

When you have pronouns such as "someone," the tendency is to not use the possessive gerund.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10