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1
Jar in this context refers to a sharp or unpleasant sound.  I guess it fits pretty well with the translation, although 'bang' doesn't quite imply the harshness of 'jar'. 
2
The Vengeance stooped, and the jar of a drum was heard as she moved it at her feet behind the counter. (from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens; a larger context is here; use ctrl-f to locate the sentence)

Please explain "the jar of a drum".  "Vengeance" is a nickname.  A help site translates it into the below, but I have a doubt.  Thanks.  --- tk

The Vengeance stooped over, and the bang of a drum was heard as she moved out from behind the counter at her feet. (from here)
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Language Questions / Re: get set
« Last post by admin on February 20, 2017, 03:30:15 pm »
Yes. That is what  meant in my point #2- but you have clarified it - thanks Britta
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Language Questions / Re: each/every/all
« Last post by admin on February 20, 2017, 03:26:48 pm »
2 = a

b = what is your total wages bill.
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Language Questions / Re: each/every/all
« Last post by davel on February 20, 2017, 01:21:17 pm »
I cannot give an answer but I think you have answered it yourself in your a) and b). Include the words "individual" and "total sum" in the sentences to make them clear.
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Language Questions / Re: get set
« Last post by Britta on February 20, 2017, 11:53:53 am »
A bit of colour might help:

As people get older, they get set in their ways.

"Set in their ways" means people like to do things in a certain way (bathing on a special day, cleaning house in a special order of tasks, eating habits etc.)

When people grow older they become less flexible.
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Language Questions / Re: anybody/everybody
« Last post by admin on February 19, 2017, 04:25:09 pm »
#2 is fine
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Language Questions / anybody/everybody
« Last post by navi on February 19, 2017, 01:32:50 pm »
Are these both correct:

1) Anybody does things they regret.

2) Everybody does things they regret.


Gratefully,

Navi.
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Language Questions / Re: get set
« Last post by admin on February 17, 2017, 05:18:21 pm »
Get set has two meanings.

1. Be prepared to do something. As in a race. Get set; ready; so. In that sense, it does mean to be in position.
2. Set - as in glue. I have glued those two pieces together. Do you think they are set now? So, get set in their ways means that they have a habitual routine - they always do the same thing.

So their is similarity - but there are differences.
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Language Questions / get set
« Last post by arturas on February 17, 2017, 03:50:47 pm »
Hi there,

I can't get the idea of what get set means in the following sentence:

As people get older, they get set in their ways.

I know that it has something to do with a habit, but could you please rephrase this sentence for me ?

Regards,
Arturas
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