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Language Questions / Re: ---- every concession had its recognized equivalent
« Last post by admin on November 22, 2017, 04:52:29 pm »
I will give you something if you give me something in return.
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Language Questions / ---- every concession had its recognized equivalent
« Last post by t k on November 22, 2017, 04:39:19 am »
Put by Rosedale in terms of business-like give-and-take, this understanding took on the harmless air of a mutual accommodation, like a transfer of property or a revision of boundary lines. It certainly simplified life to view it as a perpetual adjustment, a play of party politics, in which every concession had its recognized equivalent: Lily's tired mind was fascinated by this escape from fluctuating ethical estimates into a region of concrete weights and measures.  (from The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton; a larger context is here; use ctrl-f to locate the sentence)

Please explain "every concession had its recognized equivalent".  Thanks.  --- tk
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Language Questions / Re: ---- new hands, I'm all broken up on you
« Last post by Mr Tasker on November 21, 2017, 10:45:14 am »
I should correct myself slightly. "Hands" doesn't only refer to crewman on a ship. I suppose I associate it most with the phrase "all hands on deck" (meaning everyone has to pitch in and help).

But there can be farm hands and hired hands and others.
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Language Questions / Re: ---- made free of her
« Last post by Mr Tasker on November 21, 2017, 10:40:18 am »
Hi

This means being overly familiar, overly intimate.

It's not very common in modern English.
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Language Questions / Re: ---- new hands, I'm all broken up on you
« Last post by Mr Tasker on November 21, 2017, 10:33:50 am »
Hi

A "hand" is member of the crew on a ship. This is an example of synecdoche.

So, "an old hand" is figuratively someone experienced or accustomed to something. He "knows the ropes" to add another nautical expression. A "new hand" is less common, at least in modern English, but the meaning is clear: a novice/new boy/newbie.

"All broken up" just means upset, distressed, in this case with the addition of "on you" it evidently means "head over heels in love with you".
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Language Questions / ---- made free of her
« Last post by t k on November 21, 2017, 09:36:15 am »
As she walked beside him, shrinking in every nerve from the way in which his look and tone made free of her, yet telling herself that this momentary endurance of his mood was the price she must pay for her ultimate power over him, she tried to calculate the exact point at which concession must turn to resistance, and the price HE would have to pay be made equally clear to him.  (from The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton; a larger context is here; use ctrl-f to locate the sentence)

Please explain "made free of her".  Thanks.  --- tk
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Language Questions / ---- new hands, I'm all broken up on you
« Last post by t k on November 21, 2017, 09:25:04 am »
Well—why shouldn't you hear my reasons for doing it, then? We're neither of us such new hands that a little plain speaking is going to hurt us. I'm all broken up on you: there's nothing new in that. I'm more in love with you than I was this time last year; but I've got to face the fact that the situation is changed.  (from The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton; a larger context is here; use ctrl-f to locate the sentence)

Please explain "new hands" and "I'm all broken up on you".  Thanks.  --- tk
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Language Questions / Re: ---- bore herself with the really fashionable
« Last post by admin on November 20, 2017, 12:37:14 pm »
Yes - exactly so.
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Language Questions / Re: buy anything you need
« Last post by admin on November 20, 2017, 12:35:53 pm »
1b and 2b
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Language Questions / buy anything you need
« Last post by navi on November 20, 2017, 06:35:25 am »
1) You're wrong to think that you can buy anything you need in that store.

Can't '1' have both the following meanings:

1a) You're wrong to think that you can buy just anything you need in that store.
1b) You're wrong to think that you can buy a single thing you need in that store.

================

2) I don't think you can buy anything you need in that store.

Can't '2' have both the following meanings:

2a) I don't think you can buy just anything you need in that store.
2b) I don't think you can buy a single thing you need in that store.

Gratefully,
Navi.
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