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Language Questions / Re: only the priests can / could eat
« Last post by admin on Today at 10:25:44 am »
Yes - it was still true when Jesus spoke those words.
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Language Questions / Re: only the priests can / could eat
« Last post by Darryl on March 23, 2019, 09:15:40 pm »
I think 'can' is OK in that context. It is referring to the on-going law itself rather than the one incident.
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Language Questions / only the priests can / could eat
« Last post by bookworm on March 23, 2019, 06:29:36 pm »
3 Jesus replied, “Haven’t you read in the Scriptures what David did when he and his companions were hungry? 4 He went into the house of God and broke the law by eating the sacred loaves of bread that only the priests can eat. He also gave some to his companions.”

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Luke+6&version=NLT

I think it should read could, not can, because it's talking about the past.

... and broke the law by eating the sacred loaves of bread that only the priests could eat.

Do you agree?
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Café / Re: Here we go again
« Last post by Bertha on March 23, 2019, 10:51:19 am »
They are separate systems but similar in formation and intensity. At least we get a bit more notice with cyclones than you get with your tornadoes, Bertha.  Gives us some preparation time, but the waiting can be stressful.

Yes, your cyclones are similar to the hurricanes that hit the US.  In the last week or so, the upper midwest and plains states, especially Nebraska, South Dakota, Wisconsin and surrounding areas, have been flooded.  The snow and ice this past winter was really deep, so now it's melting and flooding everywhere.  I don't know the depth, but it has flooded not only towns but many, many farms across that region.  The people along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers are under a watch downstream, all the way to New Orleans, since all that water will eventually drain off and flood along those rivers, too. 

We actually do have various means now to predict the areas that need to take precautions and be "weather aware" due to having the National Weather Service right here in Norman, Oklahoma.  http://www.ou.edu/nwc  They keep developing ways and means, mostly technological, of predicting and tracking severe weather.  They can tell many days in advance when, where and potentially how a storm system might cause tornadoes, high winds, etc. Our weather people report the information to keep everyone updated.  There can be some stress and jitters beforehand and during a storm, but knowing where it will be going helps with those.

A side note--with changes occurring in the world's climate, the location of Tornado Alley has moved a little.  Oklahoma will still be vulnerable but father east has started to have more numerous tornadoes, and many of those residents aren't used to their occurring. 
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Café / Re: Here we go again
« Last post by Darryl on March 22, 2019, 12:19:08 pm »
They are separate systems but similar in formation and intensity. At least we get a bit more notice with cyclones than you get with your tornadoes, Bertha.  Gives us some preparation time, but the waiting can be stressful.
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Café / Re: Here we go again
« Last post by Bertha on March 22, 2019, 11:11:44 am »
These are bad storms. Are these the same systems as those that hit eastern Africa and devastated at least three countries?  https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-47638696

Please stay safe.
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Language Questions / Re: Is the idiomatic meaning retained after Passivization?
« Last post by Jay on March 22, 2019, 10:04:52 am »
I do appreciate for your advices!! :)
Now everything is clear !
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Café / Re: Here we go again
« Last post by Darryl on March 22, 2019, 09:47:16 am »
Yes, but you do get covered in snow occasionally, and I don't think that would be too pleasant.
The rain here has continued today, but it's expected to ease for us as the cyclone tracks away to the Northern Territory border.
Our son and daughter-in-law and their new baby have spent the last couple of days with us from Townsville. Ironically, they came north from fine weather in flood-ravaged Townsville, only to find continuous rain up here.
Ah, the vagaries of the tropical Wet.
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Language Questions / Re: Is the idiomatic meaning retained after Passivization?
« Last post by Darryl on March 22, 2019, 09:38:18 am »
Sorry, I took the sentence literally. I now see the idiom.
My son travelled from here on the Tablelands to the coast today amid a lot of tropical rain. We checked the weather map first but the coast was clear. I'm afraid my mind is stuck on weather conditions at present.
The sentence can be literal or idiomatic.

In answer to your last question, the meaning is retained, but it's just not natural.
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Language Questions / Re: Is the idiomatic meaning retained after Passivization?
« Last post by Jay on March 22, 2019, 07:59:39 am »
Thanks! I understand what Darryl said. Normally the native speakers don't use the passive like (2).
I'm sorry for asking again, does it mean that the meaning is not retained?
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