Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Language Questions / Re: to take to school
« Last post by navi on Today at 04:33:53 am »
Thank you very much, Mr. Tasker,

I suspected that "2" could be used in two different ways, but things weren't too clear in my head. Your answer really helped clarify everything.

Respectfully,
Navi.
2
Language Questions / Re: give way to
« Last post by Takashi on Today at 12:59:45 am »
Thank  you very much indeed, Mr Tasker!
I really appreciate it.

Everything is clear now.

Takashi
3
Language Questions / Re: to take to school
« Last post by Mr Tasker on November 24, 2017, 11:07:19 pm »
Hi

She can say all of them since we know the context.

Mother and son would both understand who is going to school and who is buying cookies.

In a different context they could become ambiguous.

1) Say the son is going to school on Friday and the mother is going to a fund raiser at the school on Saturday. 

2) Very clear, but ... there could be a subtle shade of meaning. Is the mother explaining her reason for buying the cookies or is she identifying a particular packet of cookies? i.e.
I bought these cookies specifically so that you could take them to school.
I have bought the cookies ... which ones? ... the ones for you to take to school.

4
Language Questions / Re: give way to
« Last post by Mr Tasker on November 24, 2017, 10:56:00 pm »
Hi

Yes, it can refer to people, and in fact it's a closer metaphor when it does.

"Give way to" literally means to stop and allow someone else to go before you.

In the old/young usage it means that old people should allow young people to do more things, like take up positions of responsibility at work.

The storm example is completely valid, but the "giving way" is now more figurative since storms and sunshines obviously have no control over their actions.
5
Language Questions / to take to school
« Last post by navi on November 24, 2017, 10:21:47 pm »
A mother has bought cookies for her son to take to school. The son is going to take them to school, not the mother.
Which of the following can she say to her son:

1) I have bought the cookies to take to school.

2) I have bought the cookies for you to take to school.

3) I have bought the cookies that you have to take to school.

Gratefully,
Navi.
6
Language Questions / give way to
« Last post by Takashi on November 24, 2017, 04:51:30 pm »
I'd appreciate it if you could help me with the following sentence.

"It is time that the old gave way to the young. "

One dictionary says the phrase "give way to" means "to be replaced by something," as in "The storm gave way to bright sunshine." However, "the young" here seems to mean "young people."
Could you tell me if the phrase can mean "to be replaced by someone as well as by something"?
If the phrase has another meaning here, could you also tell me what it means?

Thank you very much.

Takashi
7
Language Questions / Re: ---- every concession had its recognized equivalent
« Last post by admin on November 22, 2017, 04:52:29 pm »
I will give you something if you give me something in return.
8
Language Questions / ---- every concession had its recognized equivalent
« Last post by t k on November 22, 2017, 04:39:19 am »
Put by Rosedale in terms of business-like give-and-take, this understanding took on the harmless air of a mutual accommodation, like a transfer of property or a revision of boundary lines. It certainly simplified life to view it as a perpetual adjustment, a play of party politics, in which every concession had its recognized equivalent: Lily's tired mind was fascinated by this escape from fluctuating ethical estimates into a region of concrete weights and measures.  (from The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton; a larger context is here; use ctrl-f to locate the sentence)

Please explain "every concession had its recognized equivalent".  Thanks.  --- tk
9
Language Questions / Re: ---- new hands, I'm all broken up on you
« Last post by Mr Tasker on November 21, 2017, 10:45:14 am »
I should correct myself slightly. "Hands" doesn't only refer to crewman on a ship. I suppose I associate it most with the phrase "all hands on deck" (meaning everyone has to pitch in and help).

But there can be farm hands and hired hands and others.
10
Language Questions / Re: ---- made free of her
« Last post by Mr Tasker on November 21, 2017, 10:40:18 am »
Hi

This means being overly familiar, overly intimate.

It's not very common in modern English.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10